Paperwork Signed and Delivered: Ohtani To MLB Pro

Ohtani To MLB Pro Takes Another Step Forward


The MLB Pro Commissioner’s Office and the MLB Pro Players Association, along with Nippon Professional Baseball have signed the paperwork that will guarantee Shohei Ohtani’s the ability to play in MLB Pro in 2019.

Ohtani, the 24-year old, is expected to be among the most highly-coveted free-agents this upcoming offseason. Ohtani possesses a five-pitch arsenal, highlighted by his fastball and splitter.

In addition to his pitching pedigree, Ohtani has plus power and a knack for getting on base. Some are concerned about his ability to consistently put the bat on the ball, but many close to the game believe with the right coaching that can be corrected.

As of now, Ohtani and his representatives have not made any indication as to where the Japanese star would like to play.

The Los Angeles Angels are ineligible to sign Ohtani due to a conflict of interest within the team. In addition, the Boston Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals are ineligible to go after Ohtani after finishing 2018 with a balance deficit of greater than $20 million dollars.


[Note from League Office]

Shohei Ohtani has been added to the league file.

  1. He can be viewed on the league reports here.
  2. Our Ohtani WILL NOT have Tommy John surgery pending.
  3. I am not able to correct his service time numbers at the moment. Those will be changed once he ends up on a team.
    1. A reminder that he will be given a contract that runs through 2022. At that point, he will be eligible to enter free-agency again.
      1. The WITH “No-Trade” Clause Included Option
        • 2019 Season: $550,000 (3rd year of service time)
        • 2020 Season: $2,000,000 (4th year of service time)
        • 2021 Season: $4,000,000 (5th year of service time)
        • 2022 Season: $8,000,000 (6th year of service time)
      2. The WITHOUT No-Trade Clause Included Option:
        • 2019 Season: $550,000 (3rd year of service time)
        • 2020 Season: $3,000,000 (4th year of service time)
        • 2021 Season: $6,000,000 (5th year of service time)
        • 2022 Season: $12,000,000 (6th year of service time)
  4. Teams may begin constructing their bids for Ohtani.
    1. Initial “bids” will consist of three areas. These areas include: Current cash on hand, misc. player expenses in 2019, and misc. player expenses in 2020.
      1. Teams may offer cash any or all of their CURRENT cash on hand. You may not offer negative cash.
      2. Teams may offer up to $10 million in each of 2019 and 2020 in misc. player expenses.
        1. Example 1: Team A chooses to offer $5 million of their current $12 million cash, along with $5 million in misc. player expense in both 2019 and 2020 for a total bid of $15 million.
        2. Example 2: Team B chooses to offer all of their $3 million current cash along with $10 million in player expenses in both 2019 and 2020 for a total bid of $23 million.
  5. The highest 10 bids (Top 10 AND ties) will become finalists for the services of Ohtani.
  6. The finalists will be asked to submit a plan for Ohtani within their organization and a list of reasons as to why their organization is the right fit. This will include at minimum 1 promise to Ohtani along with HOW they will use Ohtani.
    1. An outside panel will be asked to vote on the decision.  Teams will be listed as Team A, Team B,…etc.
  7. The team awarded Ohtani will pay 100% of their blind bid.
    1. In addition, all other teams who submitted bids, will pay a service fee equal to 40% of their bid.

Timeline:

  1. Blind bids summaries (ie: the amount of cash, misc. player expenses for 2019 and 2020) must be submitted to the league office by the END OF THE WORLD SERIES.
    1. Teams will be notified of their standing within 48 hours of the end of the World Series.
  2. Teams will be given another deadline following this point to submit their “plan” for Ohtani. This will likely be a week to ten days.
  3. Ohtani will likely come to an agreement with a team anywhere from a week to two weeks after this point.

 

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